Fault Injection Filter

This simple example demonstrates Envoy’s fault injection capability using Envoy’s runtime support to control the feature.

Running the Sandboxes

The following documentation runs through the setup of the services.

Step 1: Install Docker

Ensure that you have a recent versions of docker and docker-compose.

A simple way to achieve this is via the Docker Desktop.

Step 2: Clone the Envoy repo

If you have not cloned the Envoy repo, clone it with:

git clone git@github.com:envoyproxy/envoy

or

git clone https://github.com/envoyproxy/envoy.git

Step 3: Start all of our containers

Terminal 1

$ pwd
envoy/examples/fault-injection
$ docker-compose pull
$ docker-compose up --build -d
$ docker-compose ps

          Name                         Command               State                             Ports
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
fault-injection_backend_1   gunicorn -b 0.0.0.0:80 htt       Up      0.0.0.0:8080->80/tcp
fault-injection_envoy_1     /docker-entrypoint.sh /usr       Up      10000/tcp, 0.0.0.0:9211->9211/tcp, 0.0.0.0:9901->9901/tcp

Step 4: Start sending continuous stream of HTTP requests

Terminal 2

$ pwd
envoy/examples/fault-injection
$ docker-compose exec envoy bash
$ bash send_request.sh

The script above (send_request.sh) sends a continuous stream of HTTP requests to Envoy, which in turn forwards the requests to the backend container. Fauilt injection is configured in Envoy but turned off (i.e. affects 0% of requests). Consequently, you should see a continuous sequence of HTTP 200 response codes.

Step 5: Test Envoy’s abort fault injection

Turn on abort fault injection via the runtime using the commands below.

Terminal 3

$ docker-compose exec envoy bash
$ bash enable_abort_fault_injection.sh

The script above enables HTTP aborts for 100% of requests. So, you should now see a continuous sequence of HTTP 503 responses for all requests.

To disable the abort injection:

Terminal 3

$ bash disable_abort_fault_injection.sh

Step 6: Test Envoy’s delay fault injection

Turn on delay fault injection via the runtime using the commands below.

Terminal 3

$ docker-compose exec envoy bash
$ bash enable_delay_fault_injection.sh

The script above will add a 3-second delay to 50% of HTTP requests. You should now see a continuous sequence of HTTP 200 responses for all requests, but half of the requests will take 3 seconds to complete.

To disable the delay injection:

Terminal 3

$ bash disable_delay_fault_injection.sh

Step 7: Check the current runtime filesystem

To see the current runtime filesystem overview:

Terminal 3

$ tree /srv/runtime